British Garrison Troops

The British Army had a number of troops deployed as garrisons in various fortifications in Scotland.  At the start of the rebellion there were garrisons in Edinburgh Castle and Stirling Castle.  There were also detachments Fort George, Fort Augustus and Fort William along the Great Glen (Loch Ness, Loch Lochy and Loch Linnhe).  Finally, in early 1746, garrisons were set up in Blair Atholl Castle and Menzies Castle.

Scotland Map

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43rd Foot and 64th Foot

I have just finished modelling the two Highland Regiments of the British Army during the Jacobite Rebellion, the 43rd Foot (Murray’s Black Watch) and 64th Foot (Loudoun’s).  I had originally modelled the 3 ½ companies (7 figures) of the 64th Foot and one company (2 figures) of 43rd Foot which were at Prestonpans, where they acted as a baggage guard as seen below.

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The wall is from PaperTerrain, with added stone chips stuck on top.  The wagon is scratch built with sides from Wills (now Peco) model railway fencing, wheels from various artillery guns and horses from the Hät Napoleonic French Artillery Limber.  The rearmost female figure on top is from the Atlantic Ancient Life set and the other two are from the Airfix Wagon Train set.

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Jacobite Army Completed

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Well, I have finally completed my Jacobite Army, so to celebrate here is another picture of Prince Charles Edward Stuart, accompanied by Colonel O’Sullivan and his standard bearer.  Bonnie Prince Charlie is a Revell Prussian mounted officer with his tricorne welded into a Scots bonnet, Colonel O’Sullivan is a Revell Austrian artillery driver and the standard bearer is a heavily converted Italeri British Napoleonic Hussar.

 

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The Irish Brigade

During the Jacobite Rebellion, the French sent detachments from their Irish Brigade to Scotland.  These were formed together as a composite battalion of Irish Piquets.  I decided to model the complete Irish Brigade, which I wanted anyway for my expansion into the War of Austrian Succession, then take a few figures from the various units of this to form my model of the Irish Piquets, in other words exactly what they did in 1745.

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The Irish Brigade was commanded by Marshal de Camp (Major-General) Charles O’Brian, Compte (or Vicount) de Clare.  He could have worn the French Marshal de Camp blue uniform, however I decided to model him in his Regiment Clare uniform, with yellow facings, but gave him a tricorne with white feathers around the edge, as worn by French Generals.

 

 

 

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Royal Ecossais

I have now added the Royal Ecossais to my 18th Century wargames armies.  They are one of my favourite units, so I have been looking forward to this.

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I had made one figure already, of their Regimental Colonel Lord John Drummond.  He arrived in Scotland with his Regiment on 26th November 1745.  The main Jacobite Army was marching south from Carlisle towards Preston at that stage.  Major General Lord Strathallan had been left in command of a small number of Jacobite forces in Scotland, but Lord John Drummond was now appointed as a Jacobite Lieutenant General, so took over command of the troops in Scotland and set about raising considerably more.  I modelled him wearing the Scottish version of his Royal Ecossais uniform, short jacket and blue bonnet, with a plaid slung over his left shoulder.

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Two Small Jacobite Units

I have made two more small Jacobite units, both of which were at Culloden.

The first is Kilmarnock’s Foot Guards.  This was formed by dismounting Kilmarnock’s Horse Grenadiers and Pitsligo’s Horse, so that their horses could be used by the only Squadron of Fitzjames’ Horse which made it to Scotland (the other three Squadrons and all of the horses of that French Regiment being captured by the Royal Navy).

Kilmarnock’s Horse Grenadiers were 50 men (modelled as two figures) and Pitsligo’s Horse 130 men (modelled as four figures).  I had previously modelled these units as mounted, looking like this, with Kilmarnock’s Horse Grenadiers being on the left of the picture and Pitsligo’s Horse on the right.

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Jacobite Siege Artillery

The Jacobites conducted several sieges, but were hampered by the lack of suitable artillery.  This was partially solved by the landing of some heavier French guns in November 1745.  These comprised 2 x 8 pounders, 2 x 12 pounders and 2 x 16 pounders.  I decided to model these on my standard 18th Century ratio of one model per two real guns, so just one of each calibre.  I use different manufacturers models to portray guns of different calibres and mix up carriages and tubes (gun barrels) to suit as shown below:

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Jacobite Logistics

I like having Logistic units for my Wargames Armies.  They may not get a lot of use but come in handy for some scenarios.  The British Army used a half battalion of Highlanders to guard their baggage train at both Prestonpans and Culloden.  The Battle of Clifton was fought as a delaying action to give the Jacobites time to withdraw their artillery and logistic train over the hills.

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In most 18th and 19th Century Armies, logistics were organised by commissaries.  The post of Commissary-General was normally a civilian or semi-civilian one.  However the Jacobite Commissary-General, Colonel Lachlan MacLachlan, was very much a soldier, and died at the end of Culloden, leading his clan in a charge.  Here is my model of him.  He is a highly converted Strelets Napoleonic British Light Dragoon.

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Jacobite Field Artillery

Well, I have finally finished my Jacobite Field Artillery.  Their guns were either captured British ones or provided by the French.  The Gunners themselves were lowlanders, mainly recruited from the Duke of Perth’s Regiment, with a small number of French Artillery providing command and technical direction.  Here is a typical detachment of two model guns (representing four real guns).  These guns are British 3 pounders (IMEX AWI American guns), the Jacobite crewmen are conversions from that same set, whilst the French Gunner is a conversion from a Strelets Russian Artillery of Peter I set.

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