Cope’s Supply Train

On 20th August 1745, at the beginning of the Jacobite Rebellion, Lieutenant General Cope marched north towards the Highlands.

1 - scotland map

 

He used pack horses for his supply train since the poor roads would be unsuitable for wagons.  I therefore decided to model these.

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New Military Historical Research Article

There has been a long gap in my postings, originally due to being away for most of the summer, then the need to complete three Military History talks which I had promised to give to various groups during the autumn.

I have now finished that and have added a new Military Historical Research article.  This is on “The Evolution of Tactics in the 18th Century” and may be viewed here.  It will be followed by other articles on tactics during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars.

WordPress have changed their formatting, so I had to insert the endnotes manually and they do not automatically link, as on previous pages.

Fort William

Having captured both Fort George at Inverness and Fort Augustus, at the southern end of Loch Ness, the Jacobites moved on to the third Fort in the chain down the “Great Glen” formed by Loch Ness, Loch Lochy and Loch Linnhe.  This was Fort William, which although constructed in a Vauban style was of a very irregular shape due to its position on the junction of Loch Linnhe and the River Nevis, as shown below.

Fort William - 1

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Fort Augustus

In my last post I described how the Jacobites captured Fort George at Inverness in February 1746.  They then moved south to besiege Fort Augustus, which was at the southern end of Loch Ness.  This was a “modern” Vauban style fortress, with four bastions, but it suffered from a couple of fundamental flaws in its design.  Here is an old print of it.

Fort Augustus - 1

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Fort George – Inverness

The “modern” Fort George is a Vauban style fortification to the north of Inverness, but this was built after the Jacobite Rebellion.  In 1746, Fort George was the name given to the old medieval castle guarding the bridge to the south of Inverness.  I decided I needed a Medieval castle to represent this, and explained how I created it in my last post.

The castle reverted to its original name of Inverness Castle after the Jacobite Rebellion and was considerably expanded in the 19th Century.  However I found an old print of it in 1746 and realised that at that time it was mainly a keep plus curtain walls extending out along the banks of the River Ness towards the town.

Inverness - 1

All of the 19th Century extensions were built on the ground in front of the castle from this view.

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Medieval Castle

I realised that I needed a medieval castle to represent Fort George in Inverness.  The “modern” Fort George is a Vauban style fortification to the north of Inverness, but this was built after the Jacobite Rebellion.  In 1746 Fort George was the name given to the original Inverness Castle, overlooking the bridge to the south of the city.

Castle - 1

 

I looked around for various card medieval castles and decided that the Usborne one was most suitable for my needs.  It is to the same 15mm scale which I use for all of my buildings, one size down from my 23mm (1:72) wargame figures.

It is designed to be made on a fixed pattern, stuck down to a 24″ x 18″ (60mm x 45mm) base.  However I decided to make it in modular sections to give me more flexibility in its use.

 

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