Rod’s Wargaming Website

Having been wargaming for over 50 years, I thought I would set this website up as a record of my activities.

The “About” page contains a history of my wargaming over the years, and since I grew up in Southampton, which many might regard as the spiritual home of wargaming in UK, you will notice some well known pioneers of the hobby mentioned there.

The other Top Menu pages are devoted to the different historical periods of my wargaming, in the main sections of Ancients and Horse & Musket.  The Ancient section has drop down sub-menus of Roman Era and Medieval.  The Horse & Musket section has drop down sub-menus of 18th Century, Napoleonic and Zulu War.  There is also a section on General matters, which includes sub-pages on Terrain, PlanningModelling Tips and Wargame Accessories.

Finally there is a section on Military Historical Research, containing a number of items of straight (ie not wargaming) matters which I have researched over the years.  This section comprises two drop down sub-sections, one on Organisation and one on Tactics.  The former includes a paper on the Authorised Establishments of the British Army (1802-1815), which has details of the organisational structure of infantry, cavalry, artillery, engineers and supporting units.  It also includes a paper on British Converged Light Battalions, the latter formed by converging all of the light infantry and rifle companies in each brigade, plus several further papers.

The right end of the Top Menu has a Contact page and a Search button.

The postings on the Blog record my current model soldier production or wargaming activities.  I also use this to announce any new pages published on the website.  The blog postings below are in reverse chronological order, but can also be accessed by subject through the side menu.

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Fort William

Having captured both Fort George at Inverness and Fort Augustus, at the southern end of Loch Ness, the Jacobites moved on to the third Fort in the chain down the “Great Glen” formed by Loch Ness, Loch Lochy and Loch Linnhe.  This was Fort William, which although constructed in a Vauban style was of a very irregular shape due to its position on the junction of Loch Linnhe and the River Nevis, as shown below.

Fort William - 1

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Fort Augustus

In my last post I described how the Jacobites captured Fort George at Inverness in February 1746.  They then moved south to besiege Fort Augustus, which was at the southern end of Loch Ness.  This was a “modern” Vauban style fortress, with four bastions, but it suffered from a couple of fundamental flaws in its design.  Here is an old print of it.

Fort Augustus - 1

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Fort George – Inverness

The “modern” Fort George is a Vauban style fortification to the north of Inverness, but this was built after the Jacobite Rebellion.  In 1746, Fort George was the name given to the old medieval castle guarding the bridge to the south of Inverness.  I decided I needed a Medieval castle to represent this, and explained how I created it in my last post.

The castle reverted to its original name of Inverness Castle after the Jacobite Rebellion and was considerably expanded in the 19th Century.  However I found an old print of it in 1746 and realised that at that time it was mainly a keep plus curtain walls extending out along the banks of the River Ness towards the town.

Inverness - 1

All of the 19th Century extensions were built on the ground in front of the castle from this view.

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Medieval Castle

I realised that I needed a medieval castle to represent Fort George in Inverness.  The “modern” Fort George is a Vauban style fortification to the north of Inverness, but this was built after the Jacobite Rebellion.  In 1746 Fort George was the name given to the original Inverness Castle, overlooking the bridge to the south of the city.

Castle - 1

 

I looked around for various card medieval castles and decided that the Usborne one was most suitable for my needs.  It is to the same 15mm scale which I use for all of my buildings, one size down from my 23mm (1:72) wargame figures.

It is designed to be made on a fixed pattern, stuck down to a 24″ x 18″ (60mm x 45mm) base.  However I decided to make it in modular sections to give me more flexibility in its use.

 

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British Garrison Troops

The British Army had a number of troops deployed as garrisons in various fortifications in Scotland.  At the start of the rebellion there were garrisons in Edinburgh Castle and Stirling Castle.  There were also detachments Fort George, Fort Augustus and Fort William along the Great Glen (Loch Ness, Loch Lochy and Loch Linnhe).  Finally, in early 1746, garrisons were set up in Blair Atholl Castle and Menzies Castle.

Scotland Map

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Highland Independent Companies

My previous post covered the Argyll Militia, formed in the South West of Scotland to counter the Jacobite Rebellion.   Duncan Forbes, Lord Culloden, was Lord President of Scotland, effectively its Governor in the absence of the Secretary of State for Scotland who was in London.

Lord Loudoun

 

In September 1745, Duncan Forbes was authorised to raise 20 Highland Independent Companies in the North East of Scotland.  These were to operate under the command of Colonel John Campbell, Lord Loudoun, who commanded the 64th Foot.  I had already modelled him since he served as General Cope’s Adjutant General at the Battle of Prestonpans and here he is here.  After Prestonpans he escaped to Inverness and continued to recruit his regiment from there.

 

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