Rod’s Wargaming Website

Having been wargaming for over 50 years, I thought I would set this website up as a record of my activities.

The “About” page contains a history of my wargaming over the years, and since I grew up in Southampton, which many might regard as the spiritual home of wargaming in UK, you will notice some well known pioneers of the hobby mentioned there.

The other Top Menu pages are devoted to the different historical periods of my wargaming, in the main sections of Ancients and Horse & Musket.  The Ancient section has drop down sub-menus of Roman Era and Medieval.  The Horse & Musket section has drop down sub-menus of 18th Century, Napoleonic and Zulu War.  There is also a section on General matters, which includes sub-pages on Terrain, PlanningModelling Tips and Wargame Accessories.

Finally there is a section on Military Historical Research, containing a number of items of straight (ie not wargaming) matters which I have researched over the years.  This section comprises two drop down sub-sections, one on Organisation and one on Tactics.  The former includes a paper on the Authorised Establishments of the British Army (1802-1815), which has details of the organisational structure of infantry, cavalry, artillery, engineers and supporting units.  It also includes a paper on British Converged Light Battalions, the latter formed by converging all of the light infantry and rifle companies in each brigade, plus several further papers.

The right end of the Top Menu has a Contact page and a Search button.

The postings on the Blog record my current model soldier production or wargaming activities.  I also use this to announce any new pages published on the website.  The blog postings below are in reverse chronological order, but can also be accessed by subject through the side menu.

Jacobite Siege Artillery

The Jacobites conducted several sieges, but were hampered by the lack of suitable artillery.  This was partially solved by the landing of some heavier French guns in November 1745.  These comprised 2 x 8 pounders, 2 x 12 pounders and 2 x 16 pounders.  I decided to model these on my standard 18th Century ratio of one model per two real guns, so just one of each calibre.  I use different manufacturers models to portray guns of different calibres and mix up carriages and tubes (gun barrels) to suit as shown below:

Siege - 1

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6 Pounder Battery

I decided to model a 6 Pounder battery of three models guns, representing six real ones.  As mentioned in my article on 18th Century Artillery, I have used model guns from different manufacturers to represent various calibres.  In the Napoleonic era most nations simplified their gun carriages to a smaller number of sizes, each of which could be used for a range of  calibres.  However, in the 18th Century virtually every increase in calibre was accompanied by a larger gun carriage.

I had previously used IMEX AWI American Artillery pieces to represent British 3 Pounders, and I have now used the larger Revell SYW Austrian Artillery pieces to represent British 6 Pounders, as shown below.

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New Military Historical Research Article

I was chatting on the Napoleon Series Forum a few days ago on the subject of Napoleonic Tactical Drills.  It occurred to me that I did have a chapter dealing with this in a book which I began to write some 20 years ago, but never finished.

I have updated all of the diagrams in this particular chapter and it is now published as an article, entitled “Basic Formations and Movement Drills“, within the Tactics Sub-section of the Military Historical Research Section.  This may be accessed via that link or the Top Menu of my webpage.

The article covers the basic tactical structures which changed little, if at all, throughout the 17th, 18th and much of the 19th Centuries.   I acknowledge that I have relied mainly, although not exclusively, on British Regulations, but all nations used very similar tactical drills at this basic level.  I will publish a future article on Tactical Development during the 18th Century.

Military Historical Research articles

I have amended the structure of pages of Military Historical Research articles.  These were all originally in a single section, but the number of articles was getting long, and I have plans to add more in the near future.  I have therefore divided this section into two drop down sub-sections from the main Top Menu.  The new sub-sections are Organisation and Tactics.

Blog Post Categories further amended

Having created some additional Blog Post Categories, I have decided to organise them into a logical hierarchy, with main categories of Historical Eras, Troop Types, Military Historical Research, Terrain and General.  These then have various subcategories as can be seen in the Post Categories side bar.  As my website grows, I think this will make it easier for readers to find blogs which interest them.

Blog Post Categories

I have decided to create some new Blog Post Categories of Command, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery, Engineers and Logistic.  I have then gone back over all of my posts to date and added these categories to posts as appropriate.  The intention is to make it easier for anyone reading the posts to find a particular subject.

New Military Historical Research Article

I have published a new article in my Military Historical Research section.  It is on Napoleonic Artillery and can be seen here: Napoleonic Artillery.

The article was originally drafted over 20 years ago as part of a book which I never finished.  There is much better research on Napoleonic Artillery available now, such as books by Kevin Kiley, Anthony Dawson, Paul Dawson and Stephen Summerfield.  However, having published articles on my similar old research into Infantry and Cavalry, I thought that I would add this one for completeness.

Jacobite Logistics

I like having Logistic units for my Wargames Armies.  They may not get a lot of use but come in handy for some scenarios.  The British Army used a half battalion of Highlanders to guard their baggage train at both Prestonpans and Culloden.  The Battle of Clifton was fought as a delaying action to give the Jacobites time to withdraw their artillery and logistic train over the hills.

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In most 18th and 19th Century Armies, logistics were organised by commissaries.  The post of Commissary-General was normally a civilian or semi-civilian one.  However the Jacobite Commissary-General, Colonel Lachlan MacLachlan, was very much a soldier, and died at the end of Culloden, leading his clan in a charge.  Here is my model of him.  He is a highly converted Strelets Napoleonic British Light Dragoon.

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