Fort William

Having captured both Fort George at Inverness and Fort Augustus, at the southern end of Loch Ness, the Jacobites moved on to the third Fort in the chain down the “Great Glen” formed by Loch Ness, Loch Lochy and Loch Linnhe.  This was Fort William, which although constructed in a Vauban style was of a very irregular shape due to its position on the junction of Loch Linnhe and the River Nevis, as shown below.

Fort William - 1

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Fort Augustus

In my last post I described how the Jacobites captured Fort George at Inverness in February 1746.  They then moved south to besiege Fort Augustus, which was at the southern end of Loch Ness.  This was a “modern” Vauban style fortress, with four bastions, but it suffered from a couple of fundamental flaws in its design.  Here is an old print of it.

Fort Augustus - 1

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Fort George – Inverness

The “modern” Fort George is a Vauban style fortification to the north of Inverness, but this was built after the Jacobite Rebellion.  In 1746, Fort George was the name given to the old medieval castle guarding the bridge to the south of Inverness.  I decided I needed a Medieval castle to represent this, and explained how I created it in my last post.

The castle reverted to its original name of Inverness Castle after the Jacobite Rebellion and was considerably expanded in the 19th Century.  However I found an old print of it in 1746 and realised that at that time it was mainly a keep plus curtain walls extending out along the banks of the River Ness towards the town.

Inverness - 1

All of the 19th Century extensions were built on the ground in front of the castle from this view.

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Medieval Castle

I realised that I needed a medieval castle to represent Fort George in Inverness.  The “modern” Fort George is a Vauban style fortification to the north of Inverness, but this was built after the Jacobite Rebellion.  In 1746 Fort George was the name given to the original Inverness Castle, overlooking the bridge to the south of the city.

Castle - 1


I looked around for various card medieval castles and decided that the Usborne one was most suitable for my needs.  It is to the same 15mm scale which I use for all of my buildings, one size down from my 23mm (1:72) wargame figures.

It is designed to be made on a fixed pattern, stuck down to a 24″ x 18″ (60mm x 45mm) base.  However I decided to make it in modular sections to give me more flexibility in its use.


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British Garrison Troops

The British Army had a number of troops deployed as garrisons in various fortifications in Scotland.  At the start of the rebellion there were garrisons in Edinburgh Castle and Stirling Castle.  There were also detachments Fort George, Fort Augustus and Fort William along the Great Glen (Loch Ness, Loch Lochy and Loch Linnhe).  Finally, in early 1746, garrisons were set up in Blair Atholl Castle and Menzies Castle.

Scotland Map

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Highland Independent Companies

My previous post covered the Argyll Militia, formed in the South West of Scotland to counter the Jacobite Rebellion.   Duncan Forbes, Lord Culloden, was Lord President of Scotland, effectively its Governor in the absence of the Secretary of State for Scotland who was in London.

Lord Loudoun


In September 1745, Duncan Forbes was authorised to raise 20 Highland Independent Companies in the North East of Scotland.  These were to operate under the command of Colonel John Campbell, Lord Loudoun, who commanded the 64th Foot.  I had already modelled him since he served as General Cope’s Adjutant General at the Battle of Prestonpans and here he is here.  After Prestonpans he escaped to Inverness and continued to recruit his regiment from there.


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Argyll Militia

I am in the middle of modelling the Highland Independent Companies which operated in Northern Scotland during the Jacobite Rebellion.  Meanwhile, I thought I would post a bit about the Argyll Militia.  Later in the 18th Century several Fencible Regiments (for home service only) were formed but there was only such regiment during the Jacobite Rebellion, the Argyll Militia, formed from followers of Archibald Campbell, 3rd Duke of Argyll.

The commission to raise the Argyll Militia was issued in June 1745 to Major General John Campbell of Mamore, a cousin of the Duke, who went on to become the 4th Duke of Argyll in 1761.  However he was in London at the commencement of the Jacobite Rebellion, so his son, the 22 year old Lieutenant Colonel John Campbell of Mamore (later 5th Duke of Argyll) actually raised the Argyll Militia and commanded it throughout the Jacobite Rebellion.



I modelled him earlier and here he is.  He was the Lieutenant Colonel (deputy commander) of the 64th Foot (Loudoun’s) and I have shown him in their uniform, but with a Campbell plaid and a red saltire on a black cockade on his bonnet, which was worn by the Argyll Militia.   There were a lot of officers named John Campbell, including Lord Loudoun himself, so it is easy to confuse them.  He is a converted Strelets Swedish Trabant (Dragoon) of Charles XII.


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43rd Foot and 64th Foot

I have just finished modelling the two Highland Regiments of the British Army during the Jacobite Rebellion, the 43rd Foot (Murray’s Black Watch) and 64th Foot (Loudoun’s).  I had originally modelled the 3 ½ companies (7 figures) of the 64th Foot and one company (2 figures) of 43rd Foot which were at Prestonpans, where they acted as a baggage guard as seen below.


The wall is from PaperTerrain, with added stone chips stuck on top.  The wagon is scratch built with sides from Wills (now Peco) model railway fencing, wheels from various artillery guns and horses from the Hät Napoleonic French Artillery Limber.  The rearmost female figure on top is from the Atlantic Ancient Life set and the other two are from the Airfix Wagon Train set.

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