Paperboys Highland Infantry

I have completed paper model soldiers of the two Regiments of Highlanders serving in the British Army during the Jacobite Rebellion, the 43rd Foot (Black Watch) and the 64th Foot (Loudoun’s Highlanders).  The 43rd Foot was renumbered as 42nd in 1748 and became a Royal Regiment in 1758, changing its original buff facings to blue.  Here is the complete battalion.

1 - 43rd Foot

64th Foot (Loudoun’s Highlanders) was authorised to be raised in 1745 and was only partially formed at the start of the Jacobite Rebellion.  It later distinguished itself at the Siege of Bergen op Zoom in 1747 but was disbanded in 1748.  I have however modelled it as a complete battalion here.

2 - 64th Foot

3 - 64th Foot - Loudoun's Highlanders

 

All of the Paperboys British Army Highlanders have a green tartan which I have used as my 43rd Foot (Black Watch).

For the 64th Foot (Loudoun’s Highlanders), I used the Paint programme to outline the shape of the tartan areas, then fill these with a tartan based on that in a famous portrait of John Campbell, 4th Earl of Loudoun, in the uniform of his Regiment.

There is controversy about exactly which tartan was worn by the 64th Foot, but several Ospreys show a similar red tartan.

 

 

 

 

I modelled the Grenadiers of both Regiments in fur grenadier caps, as I had for my plastic 1:72 figures.  These were not actually authorised until 1747, but I like the look of them.  I am sure that this was not something dreamed up by a bureaucrat in London, but would have been in response the requests from the Regiments themselves.  It was often the case that dress regulations retrospectively authorised existing unofficial practice, and I am assuming this happened here.

4 - Highland Grenadiers

5 - AWI British Grenadiers

 

 

The fur caps were copied and pasted from those of British Grenadiers in the Paperboys American War of Independence book.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are the Command stands, each with a Drummer, Standard Bearer, Officer and Piper.

6 - 43rd & 64th Command Stands

The 43rd Foot (Black Watch) on the left as you look at it has a buff colour with XLIII Regt in a wreath.  The 64th Foot (Loudoun’s Highlanders) have a pale cream colour with LXIV Regt in a wreath.  Some sources give their facing colour as white, but that would have meant giving them a red St George’s Cross on their colour, which I think does not look right for a Scottish Regiment.  Both standard bearers have an arm pasted over the original one to hold the flagpole.

The 43rd Foot (Black Watch) had distinguished themselves at the Battle of Fontenoy shortly before the Jacobite Rebellion and moved from Flanders to join the Army defending London.   They did however have three additional companies (recruiting companies) in Scotland and one of these was at Prestonpans.

Colonel John Campbell, Lord Loudoun, was personally at Prestonpans, acting as Adjutant General to Major General Cope.  He had 3 ½ companies of his 64th Foot with him.  There were three more companies of the Regiment and another additional company of 43rd Foot in Argyll under the command of Lord Loudoun’s second in command, Lieutenant Colonel John Campbell of Mamore, where he was raising 24 companies of Argyll Militia.  There were 1½ companies of 64th Foot and one more additional company of 43rd Foot at Fort George in Inverness, under the command of the 64th Foot’s Major MacKenzie.  Two company commanders of the 64th Foot (Captain MacDonnell of Lochgarry and Captain MacPherson of Cluny) had defected to the Jacobites, taking their entire companies with them.  Both of these officers later commanded Jacobite Regiments.

I am going back to UK tomorrow, so will get back to my plastic wargames armies and pause on my Paperboys modelling until next time I am in Spain.

 

 

2 thoughts on “Paperboys Highland Infantry

  1. Pete S/ SP November 17, 2019 / 11:54 pm

    Very smart. A great project.

    Cheers,

    Pete.

    Like

  2. rodwargaming November 18, 2019 / 10:00 am

    It gives me a way of still modelling and wargaming when I am at our second home in Spain, which is great.

    Rod

    Like

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