British Siege Artillery

1 - Siege Artillery

I had already made four 18 pounder siege artillery guns and four heavy 13″ mortars, to use in my siege works.  You can read here about how these were made.  However I had not made any means to transport these, nor had I made dedicated artillery crews for these, so now I have done so.

In reality, 18 pounder guns would have needed a train of at least 10 horses to move the guns.  However my 18th Century infantry and cavalry wargame figures are at a 1:30 figure ratio, whereas my artillery is at a ratio of 1:2, so I have greatly reduced the number of horses to move my artillery models.   My 18th Century field artillery is moved by horses in single draught (one, two or three horses, depending on gun calibre).  For these 18 pounders, I decided to model their artillery trains as four horses in double draught, as shown below.

2 - 18lb Gun & Limber

The horses are from the Hät Napoleonic French Artillery Train (which has a useful 18 horses per set).  I have slightly reduced the distance taken up by each horse to 40mm.  The limber is from that same set.  The base is 140 mm long to allow the gun itself to be placed on the rear of the base, which has ruts welded into the plastic spread over the base to help facilitate that.  Normally I would have made it 40 mm wide, but I made it 50 mm wide to accommodate the walking driver.  He is modified from an Airfix AWI British Grenadier figure, with musket removed and a head swap as described in earlier posts.  He is designed to be slid out of the base, so I could use the same model with different nationalities of drivers.

Here is a completed 18 pounder gun and train.

3 - Completed 18lb Gun & Limber

When I made small Coehorn and the slightly larger Royal mortars, I modelled 2 wheel carts, pulled by a single draught horse.  For the much larger 13″ mortars, I decided to have a four wheel cart, pulled by a pair of horses in single draught as shown below.

4 - 13 inch Mortar & Cart

The horses are again from the Hät Napoleonic French Artillery Train.  The cart is scratch built with a platform of Wills (now Peco) planking, sides cut from fences from Ratio Models, and shaft poles from bits of sprue from that latter set, all model railway accessories.  The wheels are from Airfix Napoleonic French Artillery, on axles made from sprue.  The base is 120 mm long and 40 mm wide.  The walking driver is converted from an Airfix Napoleonic French Infantryman, since I had run out of suitable 18th Century figures, but had a number of spare Napoleonic figures.

Here is a completed model.

5 - Completed 13 inch Mortar & Cart

 

The British RA crewmen are IMEX AWI American Artillery, since I preferred their poses to those in the British set, and I had 8 boxes of these since I use their guns to represent 3 pounders, and needed a lot of those, for British, Hessian, Dutch and Austrian.  I only use two figures per model gun, representing the number of real guns.

6 - RA with linstock

 

I used the first figure unmodified as part of my 18 pounder crew, but modified the position of the linstock in the second figure so it is more appropriate for one firing a mortar. They are on 15 mm square bases.

 

7 - RA Conversions

 

For the second figure in each crew, I used a figure from that same IMEX set, originally carrying a bucket, but modified so that those for the 18 pounder crews now carried a ramrod and those for the 13″ mortar crews carried a mortar bomb.

 

The ramrods came from a kneeling figure in that same set, which was modified to turn him into an infantry sapper, as will be described in a later post, and the mortar bomb is a large ball headed map pin.  In truth it would have taken two men to lift such a heavy mortar bomb, but it is all symbolic.

8 - 18 Pounder Crew

 

 

Here is a completed 18 pounder crew.

 

 

 

9 - 13 inch Mortar Crew

 

 

And here is a completed 13″ mortar crew.

 

 

 

10 - RA Offr

 

I decided to model a British RA officer to command the siege artillery.  I had run out of suitable artillery officer figures so converted him from that same figure carrying a bucket described above.  His telescope is a piece of plastic coated wire, with the plastic stripped off the “pulled out” section.  He has had a sword and a shoulder sash added.  He is on a 20 mm round base, created from a 2 euro cent piece.

 

 

11 - RA Officer completed

 

Here is the completed RA officer.  Several RA Officers are mentioned by name in various sources, and I have assumed that the officer commanding the siege artillery was Major Lesley, although some sources say that Captain Watson, who was actually a Royal Engineer Officer (and who I have already modelled), performed that role.

 

 

 

Here is the completed four gun 18 pounder siege artillery battery on the march.

12 - 18 pounders on march

And, finally, a similar picture of the four 13″ mortars on the march.

13 - 13 inch mortars on march

 

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “British Siege Artillery

  1. Pete S/ SP March 8, 2019 / 4:52 pm

    Great work- the removable figure leading them is a very clever idea.

    Cheers,

    Pete.

    Like

    • rodwargaming March 8, 2019 / 5:03 pm

      Hi Pete,

      The idea came to me since I wanted my Jacobites to be able to use captured British artillery, as they did.

      Rod

      Like

  2. 26soldiersoftin March 9, 2019 / 6:08 am

    The removable figure idea is very clever and means you could use this artillery train with other periods as other nationalities – limbers and baggage trains can’t have altered much in hundreds of years.

    Like

  3. rodwargaming March 9, 2019 / 7:13 am

    Yes, I have planned to do the same with cattle (meat on the hoof), which I have built two sets (each of 12 cattle plus a drover) for my Jacobite set up, but also plan to use for Napoleonics, Roman era and Zulu War, with different drovers.

    Rod

    Like

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