Additional Jacobite Prince’s Lifeguards

When I originally modelled my Prince’s Lifeguards, I did so just as three figures.  This was my depiction of them as they were at Culloden, two figures of Lord Elcho’s Troop forming a composite Squadron with two figures of Fitzjames’ Cavalerie and one figure of Lord Balmerino’s Troop forming a composite Prince Charles’ escort troop with one figure of Fitzjames Cavalerie.

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I have since thought that I really needed to portray them at their highest strength, which was the situation when they marched into England.  At that moment Elcho’s Troop was 120 strong, which at my 1:30 figure ratio needed to be four figures, and Balmerino’s Troop was 40 strong, which I decided to round up to 2 figures.

I therefore needed three more figures.  I had some spare, because the Strelets Russian Dragoons of Peter I, which I had used for these figures have two figures on some horses. My spare ones were not the same figures as the Prince’s Lifeguard which I had already modelled, but I shuffled around a few figures from my future French War of Austrian Succession plans to resolve this.  Most of my French units were planned as 12 figures, in four Squadrons, each of three figures.  9 of these figures would be identical but the Command Stand, of officer, standard bearer and trumpeter (or drummer for dragoons), would have three different figures.  Some of these Command Stand figures were the ones I wanted for my additional Prince’s Lifeguard, so I just swapped them around.

Horses were more of a problem.  Not only did the Strelets Russian Dragoons of Peter I have some extra riders, but also I had used some standing horses for 18th Century dismounted dragoons and Napoleonic dismounted Horse Artillery.

Jac Cav - 10

 

I had originally solved this by purchasing some of the very cheap Eagle Games horses from USA, but the mailing costs on ordering a few more were prohibitive.

 

 

 

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However, a local on-line supplier of both new and second hand Model Soldiers (Harfields) was closing down and selling off stock.  I bought a pack of 19 loose Airfix British Napoleonic Hussar horses (acually only 17 useable since it included two casualties) for £1.  I did buy several other packs of figures to make the postage cost effective.

 

I then allocated some of these Airfix horses to future Napoleonic Prussian mounted Horse Artillery, which released some of the Eagle Games horses from my Napoleonic Figures to Units spreadsheet to my 18th Century Figures to Units spreadsheet.  I could then use some of the Eagle Games horses for my planned French War of Austrian Succession Cavalry, which in turn released exactly the right Strelets Russian Dragoons of Peter I horses which I wanted for my extra three Prince’s Lifeguards.

This is a good example of the way in which I can plan my figure allocations using spreadsheets, and change those plans if necessary.

The final Prince’s Lifeguards is below, Lord Balmerino’s Troop of two figures as the Prince’s escort, and Lord Elcho’s Troop as a four figure Squadron.

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4 thoughts on “Additional Jacobite Prince’s Lifeguards

  1. Peter March 14, 2017 / 8:20 pm

    Nicely done! Love to see your whole Culloden table soon..

    Like

    • rodwargaming March 14, 2017 / 8:51 pm

      Hi Peter,

      I only have a small table 30 inches x 48 inches (75 cm x 120 cm) permanently set up. I can put up one three times that size (90 inches x 48 inches) temporarily, and would need that for Culloden.

      I am planning to put my large temporary table up soon to take some photos of my siege works, so if my Culloden set up is finished by that time, then I will take some photos of that as well. I am just painting some more Jacobite infantry at present (John Roy Stuart’s Brigade), then I have Jacobite Artillery, Royal Ecossais and Irish Piquets to do.

      Rod

      Like

      • Peter March 20, 2017 / 10:18 am

        Looking forward to see all the Jacs on the table..incredible job though!

        Like

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